Blackstone Lecture: The Hidden Value of the Rule of Law and English Law

PAST EVENT | 11 February 2022 17:30-19:15

The thirty-eighth Blackstone Lecture will be given this year by The Rt Hon The Lord Burnett of Maldon. This lecture will take place on the 11th of February at 5.30pm and is kindly sponsored by Atkin Chambers

The rule of law and a properly functioning administration of justice underpin all civil society. They are the bedrock of good government, economic activity, and social development. We can see the economic benefits of these aspects of our constitution through the use and application of English law both nationally and internationally. In the latter respect, English law is the law of choice for countless contracts whose parties have no connection with England and Wales. English law and the jurisdiction of England and Wales attract international business and investment to the UK. In this lecture, Lord Burnett, not only considers the economic benefits drawn from the rule of law and English law, but he also considers the often overlooked, hidden, value that they have to the UK and why we need to ensure that that value is maintained and enhanced.

Register to attend the livestream.

Register to attend in person - please note that to be able to attend in person you must sign up by midday on Wednesday 9th February 2022.

Doors to the event will open at 5.15pm and the dress code is business attire. The talk will be followed by a short drinks recpeption.

About the Series

When in the early 1970s a generous benefactor of Pembroke College suggested the establishment of a distinguished lecture series in law sponsored by the College, no similar event existed in Oxford’s Law Faculty. The Blackstone Lectures have since 1976 provided audiences with the distilled thoughts of the most distinguished legal minds of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

About the Speaker: 

The Right Honourable The Lord Burnett of Maldon was born 28 February 1958. He studied  law at Pembroke College, Oxford. Called to the Bar in 1980, he became a pupil and then a member of Temple Garden Chambers, where he practised until May 2008, for the last five years as head of Chambers.

Lord Burnett’s practice was in common law and public law. In the early years, he undertook a broad range of common law work including personal injury, professional negligence, landlord and tenant, crime and family law. He then focussed on public and administrative law, personal injury and health and safety law, including acting as junior counsel to the King’s Cross Fire inquiry and to the inquiry into the convictions of the Guildford Four and Maguire family. He was leading counsel to the inquiry into the Southall rail crash and into train protection systems following the Paddington train crash. His final case at the bar was as counsel to the inquests into the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Dodi al Fayed. He was involved in many judicial review and public law cases and, in particular, in the years following 9/11 those concerning the government’s response to the risk of terrorist attack. He then joined the High Court Bench.

Lord Burnett was junior counsel for the Crown, Common Law from 1992 and was appointed as a Queens Counsel in 1998. Appointed as a Recorder in 1998, he sat as a part-time judge in the Crown Court trying criminal cases. On appointment to the High Court in 2008 Lord Burnett joined the Queen’s Bench Division hearing civil law, and public law cases in the Administrative Court, trying serious crime out of London and sitting in the Court of Appeal, Criminal Division. He was Presiding Judge of the Western Circuit from 2011 until 2014 when he was appointed to the Court of Appeal. He was also Deputy Chairman of the Security Vetting Appeals Panel. In the Court of Appeal Lord Burnett heard the full range of civil, family and criminal appeals and continued to sit in Divisional Courts of the High Court. Lord Burnett was the judge of the Court of Appeal with responsibility for extradition cases and was also supervising Lord Justice for immigration and public law appeals. He was Vice Chairman of the independent Judicial Appointments Commission from November 2015 until March 2017. He was appointed Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales on 1 October 2017.

He is President of all the Court of England and Wales, sits in both the Criminal and Civil divisions of the Court of Appeal, in the Divisional Court and also, by invitation, in the Supreme Court.

Blackstone Lecture: The Hidden Value of the Rule of Law and English Law

PAST EVENT | 11 February 2022 17:30-19:15

The thirty-eighth Blackstone Lecture will be given this year by The Rt Hon The Lord Burnett of Maldon. This lecture will take place on the 11th of February at 5.30pm and is kindly sponsored by Atkin Chambers

The rule of law and a properly functioning administration of justice underpin all civil society. They are the bedrock of good government, economic activity, and social development. We can see the economic benefits of these aspects of our constitution through the use and application of English law both nationally and internationally. In the latter respect, English law is the law of choice for countless contracts whose parties have no connection with England and Wales. English law and the jurisdiction of England and Wales attract international business and investment to the UK. In this lecture, Lord Burnett, not only considers the economic benefits drawn from the rule of law and English law, but he also considers the often overlooked, hidden, value that they have to the UK and why we need to ensure that that value is maintained and enhanced.

Register to attend the livestream.

Register to attend in person - please note that to be able to attend in person you must sign up by midday on Wednesday 9th February 2022.

Doors to the event will open at 5.15pm and the dress code is business attire. The talk will be followed by a short drinks recpeption.

About the Series

When in the early 1970s a generous benefactor of Pembroke College suggested the establishment of a distinguished lecture series in law sponsored by the College, no similar event existed in Oxford’s Law Faculty. The Blackstone Lectures have since 1976 provided audiences with the distilled thoughts of the most distinguished legal minds of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

About the Speaker: 

The Right Honourable The Lord Burnett of Maldon was born 28 February 1958. He studied  law at Pembroke College, Oxford. Called to the Bar in 1980, he became a pupil and then a member of Temple Garden Chambers, where he practised until May 2008, for the last five years as head of Chambers.

Lord Burnett’s practice was in common law and public law. In the early years, he undertook a broad range of common law work including personal injury, professional negligence, landlord and tenant, crime and family law. He then focussed on public and administrative law, personal injury and health and safety law, including acting as junior counsel to the King’s Cross Fire inquiry and to the inquiry into the convictions of the Guildford Four and Maguire family. He was leading counsel to the inquiry into the Southall rail crash and into train protection systems following the Paddington train crash. His final case at the bar was as counsel to the inquests into the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Dodi al Fayed. He was involved in many judicial review and public law cases and, in particular, in the years following 9/11 those concerning the government’s response to the risk of terrorist attack. He then joined the High Court Bench.

Lord Burnett was junior counsel for the Crown, Common Law from 1992 and was appointed as a Queens Counsel in 1998. Appointed as a Recorder in 1998, he sat as a part-time judge in the Crown Court trying criminal cases. On appointment to the High Court in 2008 Lord Burnett joined the Queen’s Bench Division hearing civil law, and public law cases in the Administrative Court, trying serious crime out of London and sitting in the Court of Appeal, Criminal Division. He was Presiding Judge of the Western Circuit from 2011 until 2014 when he was appointed to the Court of Appeal. He was also Deputy Chairman of the Security Vetting Appeals Panel. In the Court of Appeal Lord Burnett heard the full range of civil, family and criminal appeals and continued to sit in Divisional Courts of the High Court. Lord Burnett was the judge of the Court of Appeal with responsibility for extradition cases and was also supervising Lord Justice for immigration and public law appeals. He was Vice Chairman of the independent Judicial Appointments Commission from November 2015 until March 2017. He was appointed Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales on 1 October 2017.

He is President of all the Court of England and Wales, sits in both the Criminal and Civil divisions of the Court of Appeal, in the Divisional Court and also, by invitation, in the Supreme Court.