Javier Pérez Sandoval

Stipendiary Lecturer in Politics

As I join Pembroke, I am concluding my DPhil in Politics at Oxford. I am passionate about regime change, subnational politics, presidentialism, and the dynamics linking socio-economic development and politics. My research aims to increase our understanding of subnational regime variation across Latin America and beyond.

More broadly, I am interested in the politics of the ‘developing world’ and I have a keen interest in Latin America. Specifically, I follow Argentinian, Brazilian and Mexican political dynamics closely.

Methods wise I’m an advocate for ‘theory-grounded eclecticism’. I strongly believe that quantitative literacy is fundamental and that at the core of every ‘useful model’ lies robust, historical, and case-specific knowledge. In learning and teaching CHA and ‘metrics, I encourage a hands-on and problem-solving approach.

At Oxford I have previously worked for several colleges as an external tutor. Most recently, I worked as a statistics GTA for the DPIR’s Q-Step Centre. Within the University, I have taught the Latin American Politics paper, the Comparative Government tutorials, as well as several revision sessions to undergraduate finalists. I’ve also worked as an Associate Lecturer at Brookes University.

I enjoy working out, swimming and long walks. I’m also a Stacraft 2 fan, and a sci-fi, coffee and cinema aficionado.

Javier Pérez Sandoval

Stipendiary Lecturer in Politics

As I join Pembroke, I am concluding my DPhil in Politics at Oxford. I am passionate about regime change, subnational politics, presidentialism, and the dynamics linking socio-economic development and politics. My research aims to increase our understanding of subnational regime variation across Latin America and beyond.

More broadly, I am interested in the politics of the ‘developing world’ and I have a keen interest in Latin America. Specifically, I follow Argentinian, Brazilian and Mexican political dynamics closely.

Methods wise I’m an advocate for ‘theory-grounded eclecticism’. I strongly believe that quantitative literacy is fundamental and that at the core of every ‘useful model’ lies robust, historical, and case-specific knowledge. In learning and teaching CHA and ‘metrics, I encourage a hands-on and problem-solving approach.

At Oxford I have previously worked for several colleges as an external tutor. Most recently, I worked as a statistics GTA for the DPIR’s Q-Step Centre. Within the University, I have taught the Latin American Politics paper, the Comparative Government tutorials, as well as several revision sessions to undergraduate finalists. I’ve also worked as an Associate Lecturer at Brookes University.

I enjoy working out, swimming and long walks. I’m also a Stacraft 2 fan, and a sci-fi, coffee and cinema aficionado.