Professor Jeremy Taylor

Tutor in Physiological Sciences, O'Brien-Abraham Fellow, Associate Professor of Human Anatomy
Subjects: 
Medicine

Teaching activities

Detailed Biography

I came to Oxford as a post-doc to work with Ray Guillery on the role of melanin pigment in the developing visual system. I was awarded a Wellcome Trust Vision Research Fellowship in 1989 and then became a University Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow in Medicine at Pembroke College in 1992.

My research interest is in wiring up the brain, specifically how nerve fibres know where to grow and why do they fail to re-grow when the nervous system is damaged? A focus has been on the axon guidance decisions in decussating pathways in the brain, which result in one side of the brain controlling the opposite side of the body.

I teach across the pre-clinical years in a range of subjects Neuroscience, Anatomy, and Embryology and was appointed Director of Preclinical Studies in 2011.

 

College & university roles and committees

College Function

  • Fellow and Tutor in Medicine

Member of:

  • Governing Body

Affiliations

Department of Physiology Anatomy and Genetics

Research interests

How do nerve fibres know where to grow and why do they fail to re-grow when the nervous system is damaged? We are interested in the development and regeneration of the vertebrate central nervous system, particularly the visual and corticospinal systems, and specifically at points of axon decussation, which are complex decision regions. In development we are interested in the specification of retinal and cortical neurons to project to specific targets and the development of the known regions where such axons respond to guidance cues in development.
The regeneration of axons within the adult CNS is characteristically very poor, especially for projection neurons. However, we have shown that retinal axons will re-navigate their appropriate pathways and re-establish connectivity during a defined time window of late development. At this time the neurons are still capable of transcribing their original growth related genes, and are in a CNS environment that is neither inhibitory, nor has lost the guidance cues essential for correct navigation. We are currently exploring the limits on this response using both neurotrophins and Glial cell derived factors to extend the regenerative period.

Publications

Wang L, Wang J, Ma D, Taylor JSH, Chan SO. (2016). Isoform-specific localization of Nogo protein in the optic pathway of mouse embryos. J Comp Neurol, 524, 2322 - 2334 

Taylor JSH (2016) “Developmental Neuroscience”. Elsevier Neuroscience reference module

Lickiss T. Cheung AF, Hutchinson CE, Taylor JSH, Molnár Z. (2012). Examining the relationship between early axon growth and transcription factor expression in the developing cerebral cortex Journal of Anatomy, 220, 201 - 211

Miller LC. Freter S, Liu F, Taylor JSH, Patient R, Begbie J. (2010). Separating early sensory neuron and blood vessel patterning. Dev Dyn, 239, 3297 - 3302

Dallimore EJ, Park KK, Pollett MA, Taylor JSH, Harvey AR. (2010). The life, death and regenerative ability of immature and mature rat retinal ganglion cells are influenced by their birthdate. Exp Neurol, 225, 353 - 365

Trophic responsiveness of purified postnatal and adult rat retinal ganglion cells. Ma CH. and Taylor JSH, (2010). Cell Tissue Res, 339, 297 - 310

Molnár Z. and Taylor JSH, (2010). Shining a spotlight on headaches. Nat Neurosci, 13, 150 - 151

Ma CH, Bampton ETW, Evans, MJ, Taylor JSH. (2010). Synergistic effects of osteonectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on axotomized retinal ganglion cells neurite outgrowth via the mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. Neuroscience, 165, 463 - 474

Ma CH, and Taylor JSH. (2010). Trophic responsiveness of purified postnatal and adult rat retinal ganglion cells. Cell Tissue Res.339:297-310.

Ma CH, Palmer A, and Taylor JSH. (2009). Synergistic effects of osteonectin and NGF in promoting survival and neurite outgrowth of superior cervical ganglion neurons. Brain Res.1289:1-13.

Wang J, Chan CK, Taylor JSH, and Chan SO. (2008). The growth-inhibitory protein Nogo is involved in midline routing of axons in the mouse optic chiasm. J Neurosci Res. 86:2581-90.

Wang J, Chan CK, Taylor JSH, and Chan SO. (2008) Localization of Nogo and its receptor in the optic pathway of mouse embryos. J Neurosci Res. 86:1721-33.

de Melo Reis RA, Cabral-da-Silva MC, de Mello FG, and Taylor JSH. (2008). Müller glia factors induce survival and neuritogenesis of peripheral and central neurons. Brain Res. 18: 1205:1-11.